Voyager-1

voyager1

You may have seen that a few days ago, scientists announced that they had confirmed the Voyager-1 probe finally left our Solar System on 25th August 2012, after having been launched on 5th September 1977. In this time, the probe photographed in spectacular detail the planets beyond the Asteroid Belt, and has simply kept on travelling away from the Sun towards deep space. It is thought now to be around 19 billion km (19000000000km) from Earth, and any radio signals sent by the craft take 17 hours to reach us due to this insane distance. The power source onboard is believed to still have enough energy to keep Voyager going until 2025, after which it will stop transmitting and simply drift further and further out, carrying its cargo of one gold LP until it is picked up by aliens, absorbed by a star or smacked by a rock. However, for now it can still provide us with information, despite its cameras having been disabled and several of its instruments turned off. It detected a change in the flow and temperature of particles in order to signal its passage through the heliopause at the edge of our Solar System, and with any luck will continue to send us back information about the composition of an area of the universe that we can never otherwise reach and which until now we knew nothing (or next to nothing) about. It’s just a shame that the cameras weren’t still working, as it would be amazing to see our sun from such a distance and to get a glimpse of our galaxy from such a different vantage point.

Advertisements
Tagged ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Matilda Project

Bookish Adventures

Penguin Blog

Thoughts and ideas from the world of Penguin

Women of Mongolia

New Media Research Expedition Through Altai and Ulaanbaatar, Summer 2015

Triumph of the Now

How To Read, How Not To Live

Pretty Books

Fiction, Young Adult and Children's Books & Reviews

A Medley Of Extemporanea

Books, books and more books (and libraries too)

Great Writers Inspire

Learning from the Past

"Broken Glass"

Quietly contemplating female characters in English and American literature

Deathsplanation

n. 1. The act or process of explaining about death 2. Something that explains about death 3. A mutual clarification of misunderstandings about death; a reconciliation.

A Bone to Pick

by Scott D. Haddow

Asylum

John Self's Shelves

Anthropology.net

Beyond bones & stones

Tales From the Landing Book Shelves

The TBR Pile: Stories, Poems, Arts and Culture

bloodfromstones

A great WordPress.com site

SARA PERRY

The Archaeological Eye

Prehistories

Adventures in Time and Place

Don't Bend, Ascend

Something Different

These Bones Of Mine

Human Osteology & Archaeology amongst other things...

History Echoes

History, Archaeology, Anthropology, Technology, and Mythology

archaeologyntwales

archaeology in wales cared for by the national trust

The Feast Bowl

The Wordpress blog for the National Museums of Scotland

History Undusted

The dusty bits of history undusted and presented to the unsuspecting public.

Stephanie Huesler

My ponderings, research, tidbits & the nuts and bolts of good writing.

Nicholas Andriani

Adventure Travel and Gastronomy, Passionately Explored

Stoke Minster

the historic & Civic Church of Stoke-on-Trent

Interesting Literature

A Library of Literary Interestingness

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

Museum Postcard

Reviews and thoughts on museums explored

Bones Don't Lie

Current News in Mortuary Archaeology and Bioarchaeology

Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives

How can we use material traces of past lives to understand sex and gender in the past?

Grow up proper

A raw view on life

A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe

Early medievalist's thoughts and ponderings, by Jonathan Jarrett

%d bloggers like this: